The 3L rule, a general piece of advice

What I am going to describe will sound elementary to most of you, even trivial but I know that there is a difference between being aware of something and actually doing it. I have been working hard to spread the DevOps word these last few years and through experiences, project, conferences and articles I have come up with my very own little personal piece of knowledge; what I call the 3L rule. Learn from the world. This is the easiest of the three. Use Bing, Yahoo, Google, blogs like www.devops.com, specialized websites, books and everything you want. The world is now at your reach, thanks to the internet and the wide spreading of smartphones. How many persons in the bus or metro around you are watching a screen nowadays? How many of those are actually watching the screen and learning something new? I know I see many playing cwazy cupcakes ...

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Why I became DevOps Certified

I usually do not care too much about diplomas or certifications. To me, one’s value isn’t reflected by a piece of paper but rather by his or her actions, dedication, motivation and efficiency. And yet, I decided to become DevOps certified and furthermore, become a teacher for that very same certification. Have I gone insane or did I make a choice based on reasons that could appeal to you? Read further to find out. Set up a standard. I have been advocating DevOps for years now, reading everything I could about it when it was just a fun word created by Debois and recently writing quite a lot and giving conferences about it too. One thing that always strike me is that, no matter the context, no matter the experience of the people I’m speaking to, there is always one person asking me: “but can you tell me what exactly ...

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Impacts of DevOps on Testing

I always come across a standard question from testers in any DevOps related presentation. “Will DevOps remove the need for Testers?” A simple answer is “No”. DevOps is not going to replace Testing as a discipline. Firms implementing DevOps have a vision for better product quality workable by brilliant Testing. DevOps is an enabler for the following. Reduction in IT Budgets Efficient end-to-end delivery Lean delivery framework Working end-to-end automation framework Successful businesses today are design thinking driven. Businesses have a strong sense of urgency, aided by innovative software engineering practices. Businesses today need to have a working continuous delivery practice in place. Continuous delivery also mandates better product quality and zero touch end-to-end delivery. Automaton is key to success across DevOps processes.  Delivery by co-located, integrated teams using innovative tools prevents collaboration and communication issues. Manual errors, Stove-piped communication issues get sorted with a good DevOps Governance model. DevOps mandates “Fail Fast, Fail Often” driven by “Test First” ...

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Librato Seeks to Unlock DevOps Application Monitoring

As wider adoption of DevOps methodologies continues to foster demand for new tooling to help streamline evolving workflows, at least one vendor is attempting to address the growing need for related monitoring capabilities. Librato, a San Francisco-based provider of Amazon AWS applications performance monitoring (APM) services, claims that it is finding favor among the rapidly expanding DevOps community driven by its ability to inject critical visibility into the engineering lifecycle. Acquired by Austin, Texas-based SolarWinds in January for a lofty $40 million and renamed Librato SolarWinds Cloud, the company is touting its recent adoption by well-known providers such as Slack for monitoring of DevOps-centric applications performance and health metrics. “At its core, DevOps is destroying conventional wisdom around ritualized processes and the need to perform them, mostly in the domain of scale,” said Dave Josephsen, Developer Evangelist at Librato. “By attempting to include monitoring as a key element of the ...

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28 DevOps and Continuous Delivery Reference Architectures (Vol. 2)

People want to get going with DevOps or Continuous Delivery, but need a place to start.  Others are already on their way, but need some validation of their choices.  In April, I published the first volume of DevOps and Continuous Delivery reference architectures which has now been viewed over 37,000 times on SlideShare (it’s free to download…no registration required).  Three things helped people in the deck: (1) the reference architectures, (2) links to the sources for each architecture attached to each slide, and (3) no marketing fluff. I am honored to have helped so many people on their DevOps and Continuous Delivery journeys.  So this month, I compiled Volume 2 of the reference architectures.  You can now view the deck on SlideShare, download it (again…no registration required), and share it with others.  Have a look and let me know what you think. As I did with Volume 1, if you ...

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DevOps Dozen – Nominations are now open

To succeed in todays speed of business, app-centric world the old ways of doing business just don’t work anymore. IT and development teams are being pulled, pushed, stretched and changed into new combinations and configurations. Greater cross-functional cooperation is a must, a culture of cooperation and a new generation of tools that facilitate these are changes are sweeping in like a Tsunami. DevOps has appeared like a superhero fighting a villain to combat these issues. Featuring a one-two punch of continuous delivery and continuous integration with a finishing blow of automation, DevOps enables easier and closer collaboration between development and operation teams. Whether they be cloud-native “unicorns”, traditional enterprise “horses” or born on the run startups, DevOps is becoming the “way they do things.” The field has matured enough where we think it is time to recognize some of the best and brightest.  Our first venture with this is our ...

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The Software BOM Squad

In my previous post, “When Good Code Goes Bad“, I shared new research showing the average large development organization consumes over 15,000 known vulnerable and defective components annually.  While we can’t stop software from going bad, there are practices from traditional manufacturers that we can use to improve our ability to recall and fix the “bad” software components. The Software BOM A Bill of Materials (BOM) is used in traditional manufacturing supply chains to list the suppliers and parts used in a product, a “software bill of materials“ (BOM) is an inventory of the third party and open source components used to build an application. As noted in Wikipedia, “The concept of a BOM is well-established in traditional manufacturing as part of supply chain management.  A manufacturer uses a BOM to track the parts it uses to create a product. If defects are later found in a specific part, the BOM makes ...

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When Good Code Goes Bad

Milk spoils.  Iron rusts.  And in software, good code goes bad.  Yet the difference is, with the first two, you know the change has occurred.  With software, those changes are not always obvious. Your 5,100 Binaries Went Bad There is no way to prevent software from “going bad”.  As with all products, bugs and defects,are bound to happen at some point.  No one and no code is immune from these issues.  But who’s looking for the 5,100 software components in your organization that went bad last year (meaning new security vulnerabilities were discovered in them)? It’s all too likely, no one. Earlier this year, I took a deep dive into the analysis of software supply chains that fuel high velocity development practices and IT operations.  The analysis revealed that some of the largest development organizations were consuming an average of 240,000 open source components to expedite development, accelerate innovation, and ...

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The Whole Nine Yards with DevOps and Agile Operations

Growing up as a boy in Manchester, UK, football (ok, soccer to US readers) was everything to me. I vividly remember being herded into the stadium stands on cold rainy Saturday afternoons to watch my team (#MCFC) win, draw or lose. Back then, football was for the die-hards – no frills or fancy tech, just hot tea and a suspect meat pie at half-time. How things have changed. Now sporting events have undergone a complete transformation – all digitally-driven. High Tech Sports Take Levi Stadium, home of the San Francisco 49ers for example; considered by many to be the most high-tech stadium in the world. There’s too much tech to describe in detail, but you can be sure that all the Wi-Fi beacons, 400 miles of cable, photo voltaic energy and a funky mobile app have been designed with one thing in mind – enhancing the fan experience. So no ...

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Top 5 Anti-ESB Arguments for DevOps Teams.

ESB vs. Microservices, it’s like the holy war between Windows, Unix and Mac. Developers are always in combat. My last verbal combat was a “discussions” around ESB and Microservices. They are fun because both supporters tend to have very strong opinions about what they think is best and both want to fight each other. I recently got involved in one of those discussion about ESB vs. Microservices and the ESB guy throw lots of arguments at me. “ESB is magic” got almost burnt into my mind until I started to investigate a bit: “How to fight ESB discussions in combat?”. Here are my top 5 findings that may help in your next verbal ESB combat situation. ...

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