The DevOps Litmus Test: Is Your Company’s Culture Ready to Get Agile?

New ideas don’t come to those who are afraid of breaking the rules. Improving something usually means you’ll have to push the status quo aside and try something that hasn’t been done before. What may be a standard operating procedure will have to make way for a brand-new approach with its own set of rules and goals. This applies directly to DevOps, which requires changes in how departments operate, how employees interact and how problems get solved. DevOps may be an idea your company is considering, but if the culture isn’t compatible with it, DevOps will never become an active part of your day-to-day operations. If DevOps Is the Engine, Culture Is the Fuel Let’s say two employees who don’t normally work together wind up taking an unprecedented approach to solving a problem. To their surprise, this new way of working together is incredibly efficient and a big improvement over ...

Read More →

Specialists vs. Generalists for Enterprise DevOps

Welcome back to the DevOps.com series, ‘Enterprise DevOps Q&A.’ I have a backlog of Q&A in store, but don’t let that stop you sending in more! If I can’t answer them myself, I will try to find someone who can. For this post, I was recently asked about the challenge that large enterprises are facing over whether to use generalists or specialists to drive their DevOps transformation… Q. Does a DevOps environment prefer generalists or specialists to succeed? This question has ricocheted for a while. Google CIO Ben Fried – who spent 14 years in IT at a large enterprise (Morgan Stanley) – spoke as long ago as 2011 about how ‘Generalists, Not Specialists, Will Scale the Web.’ Some webscale businesses like Netflix even espouse a singular ‘NoOps‘ skillset, although they continued to have separate specialists … and maybe still do. However, in large enterprises, I have seen DevOps work ...

Read More →

Keep Calm and Refactor Operations

Developers have been refactoring forever to gain efficiencies and avoid mistakes. Let’s apply more than just theory to ops to do the same. There’s about a million articles, blogs, tweets and infographics available today that bespeak of DevOps as this or that or the other thing. But one core truth remains: DevOps in part attempts to apply methodologies like agile to operations in order to gain efficiencies and avoid mistakes. We need the efficiencies because the number of apps that need to be deployed, updated, migrated, and maintained is increasing, not decreasing, and there simply isn’t enough time in the day (or during the monthly change window) to get it all done. We need to eliminate mistakes because they are, according to data from initialstate, very costly. It takes 30x longer to fix one bug (an error) than it does to write one line of code. Anyone who has ever ...

Read More →

DevOps cuts out the unnecessary middle-man

How many IT people does it take to produce an application? Actually, let me rephrase that. How many IT people does it take to produce an application effectively and efficiently? For many organizations, the answer to the second question is less than the answer to the first because the traditional IT hierarchy includes layers of middle-manager decision makers that weigh everything down. One of the things that DevOps helps companies accomplish is to eliminate unnecessary bureaucratic obstacles so the people trying to get things done can just do what they know how to do. The traditional IT model reminds me a little of putting a police officer in the middle of an intersection to direct traffic when there are already stoplights or stop signs present. Every licensed driver already knows the proper protocols and procedures for driving collaboratively and sharing the road so that everyone gets safely through the intersection. ...

Read More →

The DevOps Diet (Getting Lean)

IT has gotten fat – fat silos, fat processes, fat procedures.  Adopting DevOps is a great opportunity to look at some of our unhealthy habits and identify where we can eliminate unproductive waste from our process diets.  DevOps will ultimately teach IT how to exercise more with less effort, trim the fat and get lean. According to lean principles, the seven main areas of waste are: Defects –  variations from requirements that result in interruptions and re-work Overproduction – delivering something more or before it is required Inventory  –  carrying excess raw materials, work in progress (WIP) or finished goods Over-processing – doing more work than is required Motion – moving people or equipment more than is required Transportation – moving products from one location to another Waiting – doing nothing or moving slowly while waiting on a previous step What are the greatest sources of waste in your IT organization?  Are defects being regularly passed downstream? Are ...

Read More →

Enabling Collaboration Across Diverse Cultures

Welcome back to this series, ‘Enterprise DevOps Q&A.’ In my last post, I talked about breaking down the barriers between dev and ops. Now, I want to address another, very typical question from a global enterprise about managing cultural differences in a globally dispersed enterprise. Q. Being part of a large org, our biggest issue seems to be a global culture clash. How can we address the issues of geographic location and culture that are a big obstacle for us? Large multi-national enterprises, like CA Technologies too, often have major data centers in multiple geographies in North America, EMEA, Asia and Latin America. Despite so much data center consolidation and cloud migration, cross-geo cultural issues remain a major issue. For example, in Israel the holy day is Saturday, while in the US and Europe it is Sunday, so it can be hard to lock down a release window. In Japan ...

Read More →

Microsoft strives to embrace open source culture

In many ways Microsoft is going through the corporate equivalent of a mid-life crisis—it has reached a stage where it longs to drop a few pounds, and turn back the clock a few years. After years of tremendous success, it’s now starting to show its age, and it is struggling to adapt to the new tech landscape and compete with younger, leaner, more innovative competitors. The shift began under ex-CEO Steve Ballmer. Ballmer’s approach, though, was misguided. Ballmer’s Microsoft suffered from hubris, and ignored the seismic shift in technology until it was too late. When Ballmer finally recognized the existential threat, and tried to turn the ship around, it was done from within the established bloated corporate culture. There was an effort to rearrange the chairs on the deck with a management reorganization, but it simply wasn’t enough. Then Satya Nadella took over. Nadella has a more aggressive vision. It’s ...

Read More →

Enterprises, DevOps and Economies of Scale

In infrastructure there are two economies of scale: operational and capital. DevOps should attend to the former, especially in the enterprise. Soon after cloud burst (sorry, pun not intended) onto the scene we all learned about economy of scale because that, primarily, is what cloud computing’s business model is based on. At great volume, standardization can be used to achieve greater output and, thus, can cost less. But there’s a second economy of scale at work with cloud; the operational economy of scale. If cloud providers scaled operations in the same way that enterprises traditionally scale operations, well, instance prices would be much, much higher. What cloud providers recognized is that in order to achieve the economy of scale required to make cloud a success they had to address both the operational and capital economies of scale.   According to research, surveys and studies, operational overhead consumes anywhere from 63% to ...

Read More →

Removing the Wall Between Dev and Ops

Welcome to the new DevOps.com Q&A series on Enterprise DevOps. In the first post in this series, I answered five key concerns for adopting a DevOps approach in a large enterprise. Now, I want to address a more specific question from an admin at a large enterprise about the silos and barriers between dev and ops … Q. How do you work with customers to remove the imaginary wall between dev and ops to create that DevOps environment? This is perhaps the core of a DevOps transformation – dev and ops teams working closely together toward common goals, rather than in isolated silos. I have seen several methods have substantive impacts on these entrenched silos, so I will take you through some of the more effective approaches. Familiarization In many organizations, dev and ops barely know each other – a huge barrier to the empathy at the centre of devops. ...

Read More →

DevOps by any other name still gets things done

My version of “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” is not nearly as eloquent as Shakespeare’s, but the sentiment is the same. Juliet argues in Romeo and Juliet that the name of a thing such as a rose is irrelevant—it’s still a rose no matter what you call it. The same thing is true when it comes to DevOps. The term DevOps has achieved industry buzzword status. Most people—at least most people in IT—are familiar with the term even if they don’t have any idea what DevOps is. Even among those who think they know what DevOps is, there may not be consensus on how to define or implement the concept. It is understandable that some people don’t have a clue what DevOps really is. The Wikipedia entry for DevOps is a great illustration of the issue. Wikipedia is a crowd-sourced encyclopedia, and as such it ...

Read More →
Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin